Oualifying medical conditions

Oualifying medical conditions

Photo by AP/RICHARD VOGEL
Budtenders help customers at ShowGrow, a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles. Arkansas’amendment legalizes marijuana use for the first time in almost a century though it’s still against federal law. “lt truly lelt like a miracle,” Fayetteville resident Emily Williams said last fall, describing marijuana’s immediate soothing effect on her chemotherapy-induced pain and relentless nausea other medicines failed to alleviate.

A budtends weighs out marijuana
Photo by AP/RICHARD VOGEL A budtends weighs out marijuana for a customers at ShowGrow on April 15. Arkansas in some ways is playing catch-up. People have used marijuana's medicinal properties for about 5,000 years at least, according to a 2013 report in the scientlfic journal Pharmacotherapy. Twenty-nine states have legalized its medical use, starting with California 21 years ago.

Qualifying medical conditions

People with one or more of the following conditions could be eligible for medical marijuana use if their physician believes the benefits outweigh the drawbacks:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Arthritis that’s considered severe
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Ulcerative colitis

People are also eligible with a chronic condition or treatment for the same that causes one or more of the following:

  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Muscle spasms that are severe and persistent
  • Nausea that’s considered severe
  • Pain that doesn’t respond to other treatments for more than six months
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Seizures

Source: Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment of 2016

Article by Cannabis Research Center Eureka Springs
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